April 2014 Archives

Compliance: A Poem by Joanna Lukach

| No Comments


In the process of reflecting on her experiences at the Alandi Ayurveda Clinic this semester, student Joanna Lukach composed this poem. Enjoy!

English: Terrace garden, Woodstock, Inistioge,...

English: Terrace garden, Woodstock, Inistioge, Co. Kilkenny. Serpentine patterns of gravel path lined by box hedges. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



Compliance

I sit and watch two souls emerge.

Each having a path that is laid of pebbles, sand,
and grit;

Earth Mother in each.

The composition of former generations, grandparents, animals, trees,

And all that ever existed;

Compressed.

Influenced by thoughts, energies, and lessons of
long ago

Walking this path

Holding their own.

Two souls surface

Trembling

Scared

And unsure.

With dust, fumes, loose gravel from the past, and

Particles afloat.

The reflection of self in each other's eyes.

The paths merge as one;

Compliance for both;

Never assumed as only one.

Hearing to understand each other;

Not to reply.

Slowly the dust settles

The veil is dropped.

I sit and watch two souls emerge.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Empathy and Compliance

| No Comments

          Reflections on the Clinic Experience

Lord of Ayurveda,Dhanvantari

Lord of Ayurveda,Dhanvantari (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

            Amid the vast swirl of new information I've been working and playing with during these first eight weeks studying Ayurvedic medicine at Alandi, the clinic experience has been the most profoundly affecting. 

Observing and interacting with patients on a regular basis provides grounding and human context for the timeless theory and Sanskrit vocabulary, which might otherwise tend towards academic abstraction. I have gleaned many useful facts and practical principles so far, but here I will focus on the broader issues that are making an impression on me.

One fundamental point I've observed (and experienced) in these sessions is that the presenting health concern is often a secondary or even tertiary issue. Many people are simply craving to be truly seen and heard.

It seems that a person's innate capacity for self-healing is activated by the attentive presence of the practitioner, through the exchange of deep listening and empathetic response. This process allows the more subtle causes of dis-ease to emerge and become self-evident to the patient. 

In being that clear mirror, the practitioner creates an opportunity for the patient to notice patterns and connections that were previously invisible to them. On its own, such awareness can stimulate positive shifts within a person.

IBM CIO Report: Key Findings

The other major issue I had not previously considered is that of compliance

In an imaginary, ideal world, healing is a clean process where expert diagnosis leads to a prescription for herbs and adjustments to diet and lifestyle. Then, we simply wait for the patient to return with reports of steady improvement.  

This obviously skips over the most crucial step -- that is, the patient actually doing what is asked. 

Ayurveda requires a certain level of dedication and willingness to do whatever it takes in order to be effective. By this measurement, not everyone is qualified for Ayurvedic treatment. 

Clearly, some individuals are more comfortable with their disease than with the procedures for treating it, and would therefore prefer to remain ill rather than venture outside their comfort zone.

This is mostly an unconscious choice. Deeply ingrained patterns of behavior are powerful forces. Just because a person is seeking healing on the surface doesn't necessarily mean they are able to comply with the changes prescribed. 

With this in mind, it has been valuable to observe Ma as she gently "coaxes" compliance from patients. Some people need more stern instructions, while others do well with some flexibility. Some folks are eager to do everything all at once, while others can only introduce one thing at a time. 

Knowing a person's mental and physical constitution is helpful, but coaxing is more art than science, and involves a good deal of intuitive feeling into the situation to know what is realistic, and what is asking too much.

Smoking Intuition

Smoking Intuition (Photo credit: Callt_o)

Finally, I will note how humbling it is to sit in clinic. It is a regular reminder that everyone is fighting unseen battles and should therefore be treated with the gentlest of care. 

It is a very powerful experience to have someone bare their deepest traumas, share their oldest secrets and express their greatest hopes and fears with the hope that you can help them. It is a responsibility not to be taken lightly, and serves as inspiration for me to learn as much as possible as fast as possible so as to actually be able to help. 

There is also a dampening effect as I realize that we can't possibly help everyone to the extent that we would like, that each person must take responsibility for their own healing, and all we can do is offer the best guidance we can and pray the rest will unfold in the most benevolent manner possible. 

This is heartbreaking, but then again, a heart must break in order to be open, and as we've seen, an open heart is truly the most potent medicine available to us.



Enhanced by Zemanta

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from April 2014 listed from newest to oldest.

February 2013 is the previous archive.

May 2014 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.